Milan Furniture Fair 2013 Trends

04 Oct Milan Furniture Fair 2013 Trends

Recently I attended an evening with a panel* of Australian design experts, led by Natasha Lobo from Habitus Magazine, and Fabio Fanuli, of Fanuli Furniture, on their interpretation of the Milan Furniture Fair, Milan’s Salone Internazionale del Mobile 2013.

The inaugural event, now in its 52nd year, is heralded as the interiors industry event and attended by designers, retailers, trend forecasters, journalists and industry experts. This year over 2,500 exhibitors showcased their designs across furniture, lighting and home furnishings to 324,000 global attendees. Milan literally stops in its tracks for the four-day event during which the city and its surrounds are transformed into a magical world of creativity. It’s unmissable – and for good reason.

Not only is the Salone a global forum for the launch of new products, by both established and new designers, but its where the industry turns to identify interior trends for the coming year, that influence new product design, colours and styling all over the world.

Here are the new and latest themes and trends that the panel* believe will be filtering through to our shores for 2013.

Timber

Timber continues its rise and rise, bringing warmth and comfort to our interiors. Oak was everywhere, in its natural form and also washed or dipped with pastel colours. There was also a lot of high gloss laminate on timber including tables. Cherry and walnut are coming through again, particularly in ‘smoked’ Oak (called “Terme”). Timber and metal were carved in organic, light, airy structures.

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Benjamin Hubert for Casamania Source: Dezeen.com

Piuma Table by Pierto Russo Source: pietrorusso.blogspot.it

Piuma Table by Pierto Russo
Source: pietrorusso.blogspot.it

Metallics

Burnished, anodized and matt metallics have replaced the more glitzy, shiny metals of past years. For example, black chrome has replaced silver chrome giving a restrained elegance to the material. Materials like copper, once considered ‘working’ materials, are now in the limelight and paired with colours like salmon by designers such as Tom Dixon.

Mass book stand & Coat Stand by Tom Dixon Source: Mocoloco.com

Mass book stand & Coat Stand by Tom Dixon
Source: Mocoloco.com

Elephant by Sancal Source: blog.kezu.com.au

Elephant by Sancal
Source: blog.kezu.com.au

Old Favourites

In a trend that reflects our economic times, recycled and revived old-school materials gives pieces a sense of practicality, nostalgia and craftiness. Cane, cork and rope make their way into our spaces in a new fashion. There was also a big focus on re-worked classics from the 50’s & 60’s, with slightly new forms, new colours and new materials. Other designers chose to re-work their own classics, rather than designing new pieces from scratch.

Rope Chair by Jamie Durie for Riva 1920 Source: jamieduriedesign.com

Rope Chair by Jamie Durie for Riva 1920
Source: jamieduriedesign.com

Eames Hang-It-All by Vitra Source: design-milk.com

Eames Hang-It-All by Vitra
Source: design-milk.com

Marble

Marble is back in a big, big way. Not focused in bathrooms or kitchens as we have known it for years, but now in more unique detailing methods, such as marble ‘socks’ on chairs, table tops, wall sculptures and accessories. The trend appears to be about using the material in more subtle, sculptural ways rather than ostentatious glamour. Seen in light and dark chocolate colours.

Carattere Tipografico by Studio Lievito Source: yatzer.com

Carattere Tipografico by Studio Lievito
Source: yatzer.com

Covo Table Source: decor8blog.com

Covo Table
Source: decor8blog.com

Flexform Source: Fanuli Furniture Milan Report 2013

Flexform
Source: Fanuli Furniture Milan Report 2013

Pastels

Brights are still adding playfulness and a ‘pop’ to spaces, however it was pastels that dominated the exhibition and gave an overall feeling of relaxed sophistication. The more muted colours along the lines of salmon pink, mint, duck egg blue, and pastel aubergines and oranges created a welcoming, feminine mood, used by designers on statement pieces rather than just in accessories.

An alternate look to pastels was light terracotta, coming through in lots of materials, giving a beautiful warmth and sophistication to spaces.

These muted colour trends were also apparent in floor coverings. Even Missoni, known for its bold colour combinations showed tonal and neutral versions in its rugs this year.

Toshi Cabinets by Luca Nichetto for Casamania Source: dezeen.com

Toshi Cabinets by Luca Nichetto for Casamania
Source: dezeen.com

Lu Tables by Pinwu Studio Source: decor8blog.com

Lu Tables by Pinwu Studio
Source: decor8blog.com

Pion by Sancal Tierra Collection Source: blog.kezu.com.au

Pion by Sancal Tierra Collection
Source: blog.kezu.com.au

Scale & Form

Giant, over-scaled furniture has begun to move aside to make way for more streamlined, smaller pieces. Again this is reflected in the 50’s & 60’s silhouettes we saw. Geometry is softer, more rounded. Cabinets and sofas have a floating look to create a sense of space.

Having said that, Mooi, Edra and Flexform all showed large statement pieces, though the difference now is that these have a more personalized feel, such as the sectional sofas that can be manipulated according to space and mood requirements.

Ro Armchair by Jaiine Hayón for The Republic Of Fritz Hansen Source: Dezeen.com

Ro Armchair by Jaiine Hayón for The Republic Of Fritz Hansen
Source: Dezeen.com

Minotti Source: dedeceblog.com

Minotti
Source: dedeceblog.com

Details

The simple, clean lines we are seeing coming through in furniture was combined with cute detailing perhaps taking cues from fashion – stitching, buttons.

A move to a more crafted look means that joints in joinery that used to be hidden are now becoming part of the aesthetic of the piece – creating a refined but honest aesthetic.

Japanese influences such as origami and kimonos can be found in the shapes of pieces, often with folding elements – a design that also nods to our growing desire for multi-functionary furniture.

Rubelli Cocktail Table Source: Rubelli.com

Rubelli Cocktail Table
Source: Rubelli.com

Desking

Chrome legs have been banished to make way for powdercoat. Industrial features were highlighted such as the Calamo Desk by Zanotta. Many desks and tables are featuring ‘socks’ on the base of the legs in contrasting materials or colours.

Calamo Desk by Zanotta Source: Archiproducts.com

Calamo Desk by Zanotta
Source: Archiproducts.com

Bedrooms

A softer look in the bedroom continues using natural linens and leathers on upholstered beds. Leather stitching detailing was seen on headboards. Natural timber bedside tables complimented the soft look. Another interesting look was the use of natural oak, terme and soft satin lacquer.

Flexform Source: Fanuli Furniture Milan Report

Flexform
Source: Fanuli Furniture Milan Report

Flexform Source: Fanuli Furniture Milan Report 2013

Flexform
Source: Fanuli Furniture Milan Report 2013

Outdoors

The trend towards less bulky, more refined silhouettes continues to the garden space, where powdercoated aluminum furniture with soft curves and detailed cut-outs creates a much sleeker, lighter look and compliments the forms and shapes of the furniture within the home. Again new and renewable materials feature here.

Kettal chair by Jasper Morrison Source: dezeen.com

Kettal chair by Jasper Morrison
Source: dezeen.com

Banjooli Chair by Sebastian Herkner for Moroso Source: online.wsj.com

Banjooli Chair by Sebastian Herkner for Moroso
Source: online.wsj.com

Oblo outdoor for Triconfort by Paola Navone Source: designboom.com

Oblo outdoor for Triconfort by Paola Navone
Source: designboom.com

Lighting

Lighting is definitely no longer task-focussed as designers paraded their craftsmanship from rough, handmade looking, aluminum cast pendants at Tom Dixon to smooth, spun, laser cut metal and expanded mesh. Clustered pendants were everywhere, acting like modern chandeliers. Materials varied from metals to baskets, porcelain, glass, silk, ribbon and wood. Adjustable structures allowed for the light source to be raised and lowered. LED technology is advancing and making LED lighting more accessible and economical.

Tom Dixon for Megaman Source: tomdixon.net

Tom Dixon for Megaman
Source: tomdixon.net

Nuno by Nendo for Vibia Source: archiscene.net

Nuno by Nendo for Vibia
Source: archiscene.net

Flexform Source: Flexform.it

Flexform
Source: Flexform.it

*The Fanuli Furniture Milan 2013 Trends Report panel consisted of

  • Fabio Fanuli, Fanuli Furniture
  • Natasha Lobo, Editor, Habitus Magazine
  • Kate Hogan, Woods Bagot
  • Chris Hardy, Industrial Designer, Chris Hardy Pty Ltd
  • Alena Smith, Jackson Teece

About Linda Delaney and North Shore Interiors

Linda Delaney is the owner and manager of North Shore Interiors, a company that provides interior design, decorating, styling and project management services to Sydney’s lower north shore and greater Sydney metropolitan area.

Linda has been seen in Habitus, Inside Out, Grand Designs Australia and Money magazines. She is also a regular contributor for leading Australian interior design publications, Home Design and the annual Design & Decoration. Watch out for more of Linda’s work featured in the media.

Contact Linda at  Linda@nsinteriors.com.au or on 0432 716 558.

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